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Solomon’s Summaries could help you read more efficiently

Blog / Produced by The High Calling
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Too many books, too little time. Several years ago when I was teaching English, my students and I had the opportunity to meet Sandra Day O'Connor in her chambers at the Supreme Court. Justice O'Connor told us she was required to read over 1000 pages a day. Then she gave my students an inspirational speech that ended with a single piece of advice: "Learn to speed read." (She also shook my hand and told me, "You teach at a school with my name on it." "Yes, your honor," I said. Then her voice adopted that Supreme Court Justice tone of gravitas and she said, "Don't let me down." Gulp.) Still her advice to students comes from that age old problem. Too many books. Up to 190,000 new titles every year according to some counts. High Calling Blogger Heather Goodman and her husband are offering another solution to deal with the overload of information: Solomon's Summaries . Officially, we don't do endorsements here at HighCallingBlogs.com, but Heather is offering a free download to people who are interested in exploring the service. Heather also let me review her summary of Mere Christianity . It's good. Because the summary includes 14 discussion questions at the end, these could serve as a small group study guide as well. I especially like what Heather and Chris said about the philosophy behind the service:

God had really been stirring a passion in our hearts to engage people in authentic, relevant, and transformational discussions about Christianity. Our society’s beginning to move to a more post-Christian culture. On the other hand, God in his grace leaves imprints of himself everywhere–in stories, art, business, and especially in the Church. We love talking about how culture intersects with Truth–how it shows Truth, and where it needs to be transformed by Truth.

Through Heather’s writing and speaking, Chris’ work with bible.org, and projects like Solomon Summaries, we have opportunities to help people see the Bible and God as relevant issues from practical everyday decisions about weekly financial and church life to bigger questions like purpose, calling and gifting.

I love that last idea. Helping "people see the Bible and God as relevant issues from practical everyday decisions about weekly financial and church life to bigger questions like purpose, calling and gifting" -- that's what high calling blogs is all about. Can you imagine a world where everyone tried to help people discover God's relevance to their purpose, calling, and gifting?
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